HP OpenVMS Version 8.3 Upgrade and Installation Manual > Appendix A Booting and Shutting Down Your OpenVMS Alpha System

Booting Operations

  Table of Contents

  Glossary

  Index

The following sections describe different methods of booting your OpenVMS Alpha system.

Booting the OpenVMS Alpha Operating System CD

If you need to boot the OpenVMS Alpha operating system CD, either to perform an installation or upgrade or to perform related operations such as mounting or backing up the system disk, perform the steps in the following sections, depending on whether you are booting locally or from the InfoServer.

Booting from the Local Drive

Boot from the local drive as follows:

  1. Insert the operating system CD into the local CD drive.

  2. At the console prompt (>>>), enter the SHOW DEVICE command so you can identify the name of the CD drive (for example, DKA400:)

  3. Enter the boot command in the following format:

    BOOT -FLAGS 0,0 source-drive

    Substitute the device name of the CD drive (as listed in the SHOW DEVICE display) for source-drive.

    For example, if the SHOW DEVICE display lists the device name of your CD drive as DKA400, enter the following command and press Enter:

       >>> BOOT -FLAGS 0,0 DKA400

After you boot, the system displays a menu from which you can choose options to perform the following tasks:

  • Install or upgrade the operating system using the PCSI utility.

  • Enter a DCL environment from which you can perform preinstallation or maintenance tasks such as mounting or showing devices and backing up or restoring files on the system disk.

  • Shut down the system.

Booting from the InfoServer

To boot the operating system CD using either the InfoServer hardware or the InfoServer utility, follow these steps. To use the InfoServer utility, certain configuration steps are required initially (one time only), as described in Appendix C “Setting Up and Performing Network Booting”; note that the operating system CD must be mounted systemwide.

  1. At the console prompt (>>>), enter the SHOW DEVICE command and scan the devices listed in the output to determine the name of the CD drive. Look for a device listed with its hardware address, as in the last line of the following example; compare this information with that provided by the table in step 2.

       >>>SHOW DEVICE

    dva0.0.0.1000.0 DVA0 RX23
    dka200.2.0.5.0 DKA200 RZ28M 1004
    dka300.3.0.5.0 DKA300 RZ29B 0016
    dka400.4.0.5.0 DKA400 RZ26L 442E
    ewa0.0.0.3.0 EWA0 00-00-F8-1F-70-3D

    For additional information, see the HP OpenVMS Version 8.3 for Alpha and Integrity Servers Software Product Description (SPD 82.35.xx) and the hardware manuals that you received with your Alpha computer.

  2. At the console prompt, enter the following command, where lan-device-name is the LAN device (for example, EWA0) identified with your computer:

       >>> B -FLAGS 0,0 -FILE APB_083 lan-device-name 

    For information about the LAN devices your system supports, see Table A-1 “Supported LAN Devices”. Ethernet device EWA0 refers to the first EW device. Subsequent devices are named EWB0, EWC0, and so on. For most systems, you can use the SHOW CONFIGURATION console command to list LAN devices available for boot. For additional information, see the hardware manuals that you received with your Alpha computer and the OpenVMS software product description (SPD). The APB file name in the previous command is the unique file name that was assigned to the APB.EXE file when it was copied from the operating system CD to the InfoServer. This file is the name of the APB program used for the initial system load (ISL) boot program.

    Table A-1 Supported LAN Devices

    Alpha ComputerEthernet DeviceFDDI Device

    ALPHAbook 1

    EOA0

    -

    AlphaServer 400 series

    EWA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer 1000 series

    ERA0, EWA0

    FRA0

    AlphaServer 1000A series

    EWA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer 1200 series

    EWA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer 2000 series

    ERA0, EWA0

    FRA0

    AlphaServer 2100, 2100A series

    ERA0, EWA0

    FRA0

    AlphaServer 4100 series

    EWA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer 8200 series

    EXA0, EWA0

    FXA0

    AlphaServer 8400 series

    EXA0, EWA0

    FXA0

    AlphaStation 200 series

    EWA0

    FWA0

    AlphaStation 400 series

    EWA0

    FWA0

    AlphaStation 500 series

    EWA0

    FWA0

    AlphaStation 600 series

    ERA0, EWA0

    FWA0

    DEC 2000 series

    ERA0

    DEC 3000 series

    ESA0

    "n/ESA0"

    DEC 4000 series

    EZA0

    DEC 7000 series

    EXA0

    FXA0

    DEC 10000 series

    EXA0

    FXA0

    DIGITAL Personal Workstation (DPWS) series

    EWA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer DS15

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer DS20

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer DS20e

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer DS25

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer ES40

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer ES45

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer ES47

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer ES80

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer GS60

    EWA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer GS80

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer GS140

    EWA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer GS160

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer GS320

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

    AlphaServer GS1280

    EWA0, EIA0, EGA0

    FWA0

     
    NOTE: Note the following about devices and computers listed in Table A-1 “Supported LAN Devices”:
    1. The console LAN device EGA0 is the Gigabit Ethernet device DEGXA. OpenVMS refers to this device as an EW device rather than an EG device. To correlate the console device names for EG and EW devices, compare the MAC address listed for each device by the console and by the LANCP SHOW CONFIGURATION commands.

    2. If you are using a DEC 3000 or 4000 series system, note the following:

      • On DEC 3000 series systems, you can boot through the InfoServer with an Ethernet PMAD device or FDDI DEFTA device by specifying the device name as “n/ESA0”. The value for n is the TURBOchannel slot number, which you can obtain by entering the SHOW CONFIGURATION command at the console prompt (>>>) and examining the display. For more information, see “Booting with a PMAZB or PMAZC TURBOchannel Adapter”.

      • On DEC 4000 series systems, you must specify the ISL file name in uppercase (for example, APB_083).

  3. The InfoServer ISL program then displays the following menu:

       
    Network Initial System Load Function
    Version 1.2


    FUNCTION FUNCTION
    ID
    1 - Display Menu
    2 - Help
    3 - Choose Service
    4 - Select Options
    5 - Stop

    Enter a function ID value:
  4. Respond to the prompts as follows, and press Enter after each entry:

    1. Enter 3 for the function ID.

    2. Enter 2 for the option ID.

    3. Enter the service name (ALPHA083 is the default service name for the InfoServer hardware; for the InfoServer utility, ask your system or network manager for the service name).

    A sample display follows:

       Enter a function ID value: 3 
    OPTION OPTION
    ID
    1 - Find Services
    2 - Enter known Service Name

    Enter an Option ID value:
    2
    Enter a Known Service Name: ALPHA083

After you boot, the system displays a menu from which you can choose options to perform the such tasks as the following:

  • Install or upgrade the operating system using the PCSI utility.

  • Enter a DCL environment from which you can perform preinstallation or maintenance tasks such as mounting or showing devices and backing up or restoring files on the system disk.

  • Shut down the system.

NOTE: If you boot the OpenVMS Alpha operating system CD from an InfoServer but lose your connection during the installation or upgrade procedure (the system is unresponsive and pressing Ctrl/Y does not return you to the menu), do the following:
IF ... THEN ...

You previously chose the INITIALIZE option

  1. Reboot the OpenVMS Alpha operating system CD.

  2. Choose the install/upgrade option (1) on the menu and perform the installation or upgrade procedure again.

You previously chose the PRESERVE option

  1. Reboot the OpenVMS Alpha operating system CD.

  2. Enter the DCL environment by choosing option 8 on the menu.

  3. Mount the device containing your backup copy of the target disk and the device that is your target disk.

  4. Restore the backup copy of your target disk by entering the appropriate BACKUP commands. (See Appendix E “Backing Up and Restoring the System Disk” for complete information about using MOUNT and BACKUP commands to restore a system disk.)

  5. Log out from the DCL environment.

  6. Choose the install/upgrade option (1) on the menu and perform the installation or upgrade procedure again.

Booting with a PMAZB or PMAZC TURBOchannel Adapter

PMAZB and PMAZC TURBOchannel adapters are adapters that are software-compatible with the integrated SCSI ports on DEC 3000 Alpha series systems. If your system is not a DEC 3000 Alpha series system, skip to the next section.

The DEC 3000 Alpha series system consoles implement the SHOW CONFIGURATION console command, which displays information about the TURBOchannel options and the built-in adapters in the system. When a PMAZB or PMAZC adapter is installed in the TURBOchannel, the SHOW CONFIGURATION command displays the “PMAZB-AA” or “PMAZC-AA” string, the TURBOchannel slot number, and the device status.

The DEC 3000 Alpha series consoles also implement the SHOW DEVICE command, which displays information about the devices in the system. Because the integrated SCSI adapter is built into every DEC 3000 Alpha series system, the SHOW DEVICE console command can display the SCSI devices connected to the integrated SCSI ports. However, the SHOW DEVICE console command cannot display the SCSI devices connected to the PMAZB or PMAZC SCSI ports.

To make the console display the devices connected to the PMAZB or PMAZC SCSI ports, enter the following command at the console prompt, wherex is the TURBOchannel slot number in which the PMAZB or PMAZC adapter is installed:

   >>> TEST TCx CNFG 

This command displays the devices that are connected to each SCSI port of the PMAZB or PMAZC adapter. The device controller letters are either A or B, based upon the PMAZB or PMAZC ports to which the devices are connected. Do not confuse these devices with any DKAxxx or DKBxxx devices displayed by the SHOW DEVICE command, which shows SCSI devices on the integrated SCSI ports only.

To boot from a device connected to a PMAZB or PMAZC adapter, enter the boot command as follows:

   >>> BOOT "x/dkyzzz"

The following conventions are used:

  • x is the TURBOchannel slot number in which the PMAZB or PMAZC adapter is installed.

  • dk is the device code of the boot device.

  • y is either A or B, depending on the SCSI port of the PMAZB or PMAZC adapter that contains the boot device.

  • zzz is the SCSI unit number of the boot device.

The OpenVMS Alpha operating system does not distinguish between the PMAZB or PMAZC adapter and the integrated SCSI adapter. The operating system views them as identical adapters. Because the operating system searches for I/O adapters in backplane slot number order, device controller letters are assigned that correspond to the backplane order of the TURBOchannel options, followed by the integrated adapters. This is different from console SCSI device naming, which always designates SCSI devices on the integrated SCSI ports as either A or B port devices.

On a DEC 3000 Model 500 Alpha system with no TURBOchannel options installed, the OpenVMS Alpha operating system names the integrated SCSI ports PKA0 and PKB0, and the devices connected to the ports inherit the controller letter from the port controller letter (A or B). However, if a PMAZB or PMAZC adapter is installed in the TURBOchannel, the operating system names the PMAZB or PMAZC SCSI ports PKA0 and PKB0 and names the integrated SCSI ports PKC0 and PKD0. The devices connected to the ports inherit the controller letter from the port controller letter (A, B, C, or D).

Booting Manually from the System Disk

Boot the system disk manually as follows:

IF ...THEN GO TO...

The OpenVMS Alpha operating system is running

Step 1

The OpenVMS Alpha operating system is not running

Step 4

  1. Log in to the SYSTEM account.

  2. Enter the following command and press Enter:

       $ @SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWN
  3. Answer the questions displayed by the system. When the procedure asks whether an automatic reboot should be performed, press Enter for NO. When the procedure is finished, it displays the following message:

       SYSTEM SHUTDOWN COMPLETE
  4. Halt the system by pressing either Ctrl/P or the Halt button. (See “Halting the System”for more information about how to halt your Alpha computer.)

  5. Enter the BOOT command in the following format:

    BOOT device-name

    Substitute the device name of the system disk for device-name. For example, to boot from a drive with a device name of DKA400, enter the following command and press Enter:

       >>> BOOT DKA400

    To boot from the network, enter the following command and press Enter:

       >>> BOOT ESA0

Performing a Conversational (Interactive) Boot

A conversational boot is most commonly used in research and development environments and during software upgrades. Perform a conversational boot to stop the boot process before it completes. The boot process stops after it loads SYS$SYSTEM:SYSBOOT.EXE and displays the SYSBOOT> prompt. At the SYSBOOT> prompt, you can enter specific OpenVMS System Generation utility (SYSGEN) commands to do the following:

  • Examine system parameter values

  • Change system parameter values

  • Specify another parameter file

  • Specify another system startup command procedure

  • Select the default system parameter file (ALPHAVMSSYS.PAR) if you modified system parameters to values that render the system unbootable

  • Specify a minimum startup

There are several ways to perform a conversational boot. The following procedure is the most direct:

IF ... THEN GO TO...

The OpenVMS Alpha operating system is running

Step 1

The OpenVMS Alpha operating system is not running

Step 4

  1. Log in to the SYSTEM account.

  2. Enter the following command and press Enter:

       $ @SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWN
  3. Answer the questions displayed by the system. When the procedure asks whether an automatic reboot should be performed, press Enter for NO. When the procedure is finished, it displays the following message:

       SYSTEM SHUTDOWN COMPLETE
  4. Halt the system by pressing either Ctrl/P or the Halt button. (For more information about how to halt your Alpha computer, see “Halting the System”.)

  5. To begin the conversational boot, enter the BOOT command in the following format:

    BOOT -FLAGS 0,1 [device-name]

    for device-name, substitute the device name of the drive from which you want to boot. For example, if the system disk has a device name of DKA400, enter the following command and press Enter:

       >>> BOOT -FLAGS 0,1 DKA400

    If you do not specify a device name, the system boots from the boot device assigned when you entered the SET BOOTDEF_DEV command.

  6. At the SYSBOOT> prompt, you can enter any of the SYSGEN commands listed in Table A-2 “SYSGEN Commands Used in the SYSBOOT Procedure”. For more information about these SYSGEN commands, see the HP OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual: M--Z.

  7. When you finish using the SYSGEN commands, enter the CONTINUE command to complete the boot process.

    Table A-2 SYSGEN Commands Used in the SYSBOOT Procedure

    Command Description

    CONTINUE

    Resumes the boot procedure.

    DISABLE CHECKS

    Inhibits checking of parameter values specified with the SET command.

    ENABLE CHECKS

    Permits checking of parameter values specified with the SET command.

    HELP

    Displays a summary of the SYSBOOT commands on the terminal screen.

    SET parameter-name

    Establishes the value of a system parameter.

    SET/STARTUP

    Sets the name of the system startup command procedure.

    SHOW [parameter]

    Displays active, current, default, maximum, and minimum values for specific parameters. (Use qualifiers to display characteristics of parameters grouped by categories.)

    USE [file-spec]

    Specifies a parameter file to be used as a source of values. You must enter the entire file specification, including device and directory; you cannot specify a logical name.

     

For examples of using conversational booting, see “Booting with Minimum Startup” and “Booting in an Emergency”.

Booting with Minimum Startup

In certain cases, you might want to boot your system without performing the full sequence of startup events. For example, if a startup event prevents you from logging in, you might want to boot the system without executing the startup so that you can log in and fix the problem. You can use the conversational boot to specify a minimum startup.

NOTE: Because this procedure bypasses specific startup operations, it does not autoconfigure the system's peripheral devices.

Boot the system with minimum startup as follows:

  1. Begin the conversational boot by entering the BOOT command in the following format:

    BOOT -FLAGS 0,1 [device-name]

    For device-name, substitute the device name of the drive from which you want to boot. For example, if the system disk has a device name of DKA400, enter the following command and press Enter:

       >>> BOOT -FLAGS 0,1 DKA400
  2. Enter the following command and press Enter:

       SYSBOOT> SET STARTUP_P1 "MIN"
  3. Enter the following command to ensure that the operating system does not record for subsequent system reboots the STARTUP_P1 parameter change you made in step 2:

       SYSBOOT> SET WRITESYSPARAMS 0
  4. Enter the following command to continue booting:

       SYSBOOT> CONTINUE

Booting with the XDelta Utility (XDELTA)

The XDelta utility (XDELTA) is a debugging tool that system programmers use. The procedure for booting all Alpha computers with XDELTA is the same.

The following table describes the valid values you can specify when booting with XDELTA:

ValueSystem Response

0

Normal, nonstop boot (default).

1

Begins a conversational boot and then displays the SYSBOOT prompt.

2

Includes XDELTA but does not take the initial breakpoint.

3

Displays the SYSBOOT prompt and includes XDELTA but does not take the initial breakpoint.

6

Includes XDELTA and takes the initial breakpoint.

7

Includes XDELTA, displays the SYSBOOT prompt, and takes the initial breakpoint at system initialization.

The following is an example of booting with XDELTA from the console prompt:

   >>> BOOT -FLAGS 0,7

For more information about using XDELTA, see the HP OpenVMS Delta/XDelta Debugger Manual.

Booting from a Different Root Directory

By default, the OpenVMS Alpha operating system is installed in the system root directory [SYS0]. However, if you have created a cluster system disk, you can use the SYS$MANAGER:CLUSTER_CONFIG.COM procedure to add a copy of the operating system to a different root directory. (See the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual for more information about using the SYS$MANAGER:CLUSTER_CONFIG.COM procedure.)

To boot from a different directory (for example, [SYS3]), enter the BOOT command as follows:

   >>> BOOT -FLAGS 3,0  DKA200

Booting over the Network with an Alternate TURBOchannel Adapter

You can use an alternate TURBOchannel adapter to boot a DEC 3000 series Alpha computer (with the TURBOchannel option) over the network in an InfoServer or OpenVMS Cluster environment. Examples of alternate TURBOchannel adapters are the PMAD (which connects to the Ethernet) and the DEFTA (which connects to the FDDI).

To boot from a TURBOchannel device connected to one of these alternate adapters, enter the boot command as follows:

   >>> BOOT "n/ESA0"

The value for n is the TURBOchannel slot number for the device, which you can obtain by entering the SHOW CONFIGURATION command at the console prompt (>>>) and examining the display. In the following example, the TURBOchannel slot number (listed under the “TCINFO” column) is 0:

   >>> SHOW CONFIG
DEC 3000 - M300
Digital Equipment Corporation
VPP PAL X5.56-80800101/OSF PAL X1.34-80800201 - Built on 18-DEC-1996 11:376

TCINFO DEVNAM DEVSTAT
------ -------- --------
CPU OK KN16-AA -V3.2-S6CD-I151-sV2.0-DECchip 21064 P3.0-150
ASIC OK
MEM OK
MEM OK
6
CXT OK
5
NVR OK
SCC OK
NI OK
ISDN OK
4
SCSI OK
0-PMAD-AA TC0

Booting in an Emergency

If a system problem prevents your system from booting, you might need to perform an emergency boot operation. Table A-3 “Emergency Boot Procedures” summarizes these emergency boot operations, and the sections that follow describe each boot operation in more detail.

Table A-3 Emergency Boot Procedures

OperationWhen to Use

Booting with default system parameters

When parameter values in the parameter file have been modified so that the system is unbootable

Booting without startup and login procedures

If an error in the startup or login procedure prevents you from logging in

Booting without the user authorization file

If you have forgotten the password and cannot log in to a privileged account

 

Booting with Default System Parameters

If the current values stored in the parameter file have been incorrectly modified, these incorrect values might cause the system to become unbootable. With a conversational boot operation, you can reset the active values for all system parameters to the default value. (In most cases, HP recommends that you use AUTOGEN to modify system parameters. In certain cases, however, you can use a conversational boot to modify a parameter value temporarily. To change a parameter value permanently, you must edit MODPARAMS.DAT and run AUTOGEN. For instructions, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 2: Tuning, Monitoring, and Complex Systems.) The default values allow you to boot the system temporarily so you can correct the problem.

How to Perform This Task
  1. Begin the conversational boot by entering the BOOT command in the following format:

    BOOT -FLAGS 0,1 [device-name]

    For device-name, substitute the device name of the drive from which you want to boot. For example, if the system disk has a device name of DKA400, enter the following command and press Enter:

       >>> BOOT -FLAGS 0,1 DKA400
  2. At the SYSBOOT> prompt, enter the following command:

       SYSBOOT> USE DEFAULT

    The USE DEFAULT command specifies that default values should be used for all parameters.

  3. To avoid starting all layered products on a system that is not tuned for them, possibly causing the system to hang, set the STARTUP_P1 system parameter as follows:

       SYSBOOT>  SET STARTUP_P1 “MIN” 
  4. Enter the following command to ensure that the operating system does not record for subsequent system reboots the STARTUP_P1 parameter change you made in step 3:

       SYSBOOT> SET WRITESYSPARAMS 0
  5. Enter the following command to continue booting:

       SYSBOOT> CONTINUE
  6. When the system finishes booting, determine which changed parameter caused the problem and reset the parameter value. If you specified the value for the parameter in the AUTOGEN parameter file MODPARAMS.DAT, fix the value in that file and run AUTOGEN. For more information, see the HP OpenVMS System Manager's Manual, Volume 2: Tuning, Monitoring, and Complex Systems.

  7. Shut down and reboot the system.

Example
   SYSBOOT> USE DEFAULT                        
SYSBOOT> SET STARTUP_P1 “MIN”
SYSBOOT> SET WRITESYSPARAMS 0
SYSBOOT>
CONTINUE
Username: SYSTEM
Password:
$ EDIT SYS$SYSTEM:MODPARAMS.DAT
.
.
.
[Insert line(s) to reset parameter value(s)]
.
.
.

$ @SYS$UPDATE:AUTOGEN SAVPARAMS REBOOT

Booting Without Startup and Login Procedures

If the system does not complete the startup procedures or does not allow you to log in, you might need to bypass the startup and login procedures. The startup and login procedures provided by HP should always work. However, if you introduce an error when modifying the startup or login procedure, it is possible to accidentally lock yourself out of the system.

How to Perform This Task
  1. Begin the conversational boot by entering the BOOT command in the following format:

    BOOT -FLAGS 0,1 [device-name]

    For device-name, substitute the device name of the drive from which you want to boot. For example, if the system disk has a device name of DKA400, enter the following command and press Enter:

       >>> BOOT -FLAGS 0,1 DKA400
  2. Enter the following command at the SYSBOOT> prompt:

       SYSBOOT> SET/STARTUP OPA0:
  3. Enter the following command to ensure that the operating system does not record for subsequent system reboots the STARTUP_P1 parameter change you made in step 2:

       SYSBOOT> SET WRITESYSPARAMS 0
  4. Enter the following command to continue booting:

       SYSBOOT> CONTINUE
  5. When the system is booted, the operator console displays the DCL command prompt ($). You are logged in.

  6. Enter the following DCL command:

       $ SET NOON

    This command directs the operating system to ignore any errors that might occur. If you do not enter this command and you invoke an error, the system logs you out.

  7. Correct the error condition that caused the login failure. (That is, make the necessary repairs to the startup or login procedure, or to the SYSUAF.DAT file.)

    Use a text editor to correct the startup or login file. Note that some system consoles might not supply a screen-mode editor. You can also copy a corrected file and delete the incorrect version by using the RENAME and DELETE commands.

  8. Perform a normal startup by entering the following command:

       $ @SYS$SYSTEM:STARTUP
Example
   SYSBOOT> SET/STARTUP OPA0:
SYSBOOT> SET WRITESYSPARAMS 0
SYSBOOT> CONTINUE
$ SET NOON
$ SET DEFAULT SYS$SYSROOT:[SYSEXE]
$ @SYS$SYSTEM:STARTUP

Booting Without the User Authorization File

Ordinarily, the startup and login procedures provided by HP always work; however, certain conditions can cause them to fail. A simple way to lock yourself out of the system is to set passwords to login accounts and forget them. Another way to be locked out is if one or more core system Product Authorization Key (PAK) software licenses are unavailable or expired. In such emergencies, perform a conversational emergency boot by performing the steps given in this section.

How to Perform This Task
  1. Halt the system by pressing Ctrl/P or whatever method is used for your computer. (See “Halt and Shutdown Operations” for more information about how to halt Alpha computer systems.)

  2. Begin the conversational boot by entering the BOOT command in the following format:

    BOOT -FLAGS 0,1 [device-name]

    For device-name, substitute the device name of the drive from which you want to boot. For example, if the system disk has a device name of DKA400, enter the following command and press Enter:

       >>> BOOT -FLAGS 0,1 DKA400

    If your system has a hardware password (various systems support a password that prevents unauthorized access to the console), you need this password for logging in to the console. If you do not have this password, contact HP customer support to reset the hardware console password.

  3. Enter the following commands at the SYSBOOT> prompt:

       SYSBOOT> SET/STARTUP OPA0:
    SYSBOOT>
    SET WINDOW_SYSTEM 0
    SYSBOOT> SET WRITESYSPARAMS 0
    SYSBOOT>
    CONTINUE

    The first three commands request that:

    • OpenVMS read the system startup commands directly from the system console

    • The Windows system (if any) not start

    • OpenVMS not record the parameter changes for subsequent system reboots

    The last command causes the booting to continue.

  4. At the DCL prompt, the system now accepts startup commands directly from the console. Enter the following two commands as shown. These commands allow a normal system startup while you are left logged in on the console. Without the SPAWN command, you would be logged out when the startup completes.

       $ SPAWN
    $
    @SYS$SYSTEM:STARTUP
  5. Once you log out of this session, the system completes the startup and can be used normally. Optionally, you can choose to reboot the system.

NOTE: Instead of using the SET/STARTUP OPA0: command, an alternative method of booting under these emergency conditions is to set the UAFALTERNATE system parameter to use the alternate authorization file rather than the standard user authorization file. Setting the system parameter UAFALTERNATE defines the logical name SYSUAF to refer to the file SYS$SYSTEM:SYSUAFALT.DAT. If this file is found during a normal login, the system uses it to validate the account and prompts you for the user name and password.

HP does not recommend this method. If an alternate SYSUAFALT.DAT file has been configured on your system, the UAFALTERNATE method will likely fail (assuming you do not know the password for the privileged account stored within the SYSUAFALT.DAT file). In addition, the OPA0: system console is critical to system operations and system security and allows access when the SYSUAF system authorization database is unavailable or corrupted; when core product license PAKs are not registered, are expired, or are disabled; and in various system failures.

Example
   SYSBOOT> SET/STARTUP OPA0:
SYSBOOT> SET WINDOW_SYSTEM 0
SYSBOOT> SET WRITESYSPARAMS 0
SYSBOOT>
CONTINUE
$ SPAWN
$ @SYS$SYSTEM:STARTUP
$